guardian:

Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teenage education campaigner shot on school bus in 2012 by a Taliban gunman, has won the 2014 Nobel peace prize.

Malala wins along with Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian children’s rights activist. Full story »

Photo: BBC/PA

“We will make arrests on this. We want this to stop.”
— Bakersfield Police Sgt. Joseph Grubbs, on reports his department has received of clowns standing in public holding machetes and baseball bats. (via latimes)
scienceisbeauty:

Light Printing

We are exploring new modalities of creative photography through robotics and long-exposure photography. Using a robotic arm, a light source is carried through precise movements in front of a camera. Photographic compositions are recorded as images of volumetric light. Robotic light “painting” can also be inverted: the camera is moved via the arm to create an image “painted” with environmental light. Finally, adding real-time sensor input to the moving arm and programming it to explore the physical space around objects can reveal immaterial fields like radio waves, magnetic fields, and heat flows.

Via Mediated Matter (MIT)
scienceisbeauty:

Light Printing

We are exploring new modalities of creative photography through robotics and long-exposure photography. Using a robotic arm, a light source is carried through precise movements in front of a camera. Photographic compositions are recorded as images of volumetric light. Robotic light “painting” can also be inverted: the camera is moved via the arm to create an image “painted” with environmental light. Finally, adding real-time sensor input to the moving arm and programming it to explore the physical space around objects can reveal immaterial fields like radio waves, magnetic fields, and heat flows.

Via Mediated Matter (MIT)
scienceisbeauty:

Light Printing

We are exploring new modalities of creative photography through robotics and long-exposure photography. Using a robotic arm, a light source is carried through precise movements in front of a camera. Photographic compositions are recorded as images of volumetric light. Robotic light “painting” can also be inverted: the camera is moved via the arm to create an image “painted” with environmental light. Finally, adding real-time sensor input to the moving arm and programming it to explore the physical space around objects can reveal immaterial fields like radio waves, magnetic fields, and heat flows.

Via Mediated Matter (MIT)

scienceisbeauty:

Light Printing

We are exploring new modalities of creative photography through robotics and long-exposure photography. Using a robotic arm, a light source is carried through precise movements in front of a camera. Photographic compositions are recorded as images of volumetric light. Robotic light “painting” can also be inverted: the camera is moved via the arm to create an image “painted” with environmental light. Finally, adding real-time sensor input to the moving arm and programming it to explore the physical space around objects can reveal immaterial fields like radio waves, magnetic fields, and heat flows.

Via Mediated Matter (MIT)

(via goodtypography)

“When people say ‘This is my baby,’ they don’t always mean a baby. Sometimes they mean a dog.”
— A Somali student, on what has surprised her most about the United States (via thedapperproject)

(via thedapperproject)

broadcastarchive-umd:

parkaavenue:

Panasonic TR 005 Orbitel television and Zenith remote control unit.

The Panasonic TR-005 Orbitel (also known as the “Flying Saucer” or “The Eyeball” due to its shape) was a television set manufactured from the late 1960s to early 1970s by Panasonic. It had a five-inch screen, earphone jack, and could rotate 180 degrees on its chrome tripod. (Wikipedia)

bloombergphotos:

Gadget Graveyard                                                                    
Discarded computer peripherals and electronics components are dismantled at a family compound of houses in Sangrampur village, West Bengal, India, on Sept. 9, 2014.
In 2012, 48.9 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, was generated worldwide, according to the Solving the e-Waste Problem (StEP) initiative, a United Nations program based in Germany.
Small-scale, household-style e-waste recycling of the sort practiced developing countries can involve hazardous, low-tech refining of metals from circuit boards and other difficult-to-recycle items.
The amount of e-waste generated worldwide — comprising everything from old black-and-white televisions to first-generation iPads — is set to grow 33 percent by 2017,  according to data culled from StEP’s press releases and its E-Waste World Map, an ongoing, online amalgamation of global data on the disposal of electronic gadgets.

Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP bloombergphotos:

Gadget Graveyard                                                                    
Discarded computer peripherals and electronics components are dismantled at a family compound of houses in Sangrampur village, West Bengal, India, on Sept. 9, 2014.
In 2012, 48.9 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, was generated worldwide, according to the Solving the e-Waste Problem (StEP) initiative, a United Nations program based in Germany.
Small-scale, household-style e-waste recycling of the sort practiced developing countries can involve hazardous, low-tech refining of metals from circuit boards and other difficult-to-recycle items.
The amount of e-waste generated worldwide — comprising everything from old black-and-white televisions to first-generation iPads — is set to grow 33 percent by 2017,  according to data culled from StEP’s press releases and its E-Waste World Map, an ongoing, online amalgamation of global data on the disposal of electronic gadgets.

Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP bloombergphotos:

Gadget Graveyard                                                                    
Discarded computer peripherals and electronics components are dismantled at a family compound of houses in Sangrampur village, West Bengal, India, on Sept. 9, 2014.
In 2012, 48.9 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, was generated worldwide, according to the Solving the e-Waste Problem (StEP) initiative, a United Nations program based in Germany.
Small-scale, household-style e-waste recycling of the sort practiced developing countries can involve hazardous, low-tech refining of metals from circuit boards and other difficult-to-recycle items.
The amount of e-waste generated worldwide — comprising everything from old black-and-white televisions to first-generation iPads — is set to grow 33 percent by 2017,  according to data culled from StEP’s press releases and its E-Waste World Map, an ongoing, online amalgamation of global data on the disposal of electronic gadgets.

Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP bloombergphotos:

Gadget Graveyard                                                                    
Discarded computer peripherals and electronics components are dismantled at a family compound of houses in Sangrampur village, West Bengal, India, on Sept. 9, 2014.
In 2012, 48.9 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, was generated worldwide, according to the Solving the e-Waste Problem (StEP) initiative, a United Nations program based in Germany.
Small-scale, household-style e-waste recycling of the sort practiced developing countries can involve hazardous, low-tech refining of metals from circuit boards and other difficult-to-recycle items.
The amount of e-waste generated worldwide — comprising everything from old black-and-white televisions to first-generation iPads — is set to grow 33 percent by 2017,  according to data culled from StEP’s press releases and its E-Waste World Map, an ongoing, online amalgamation of global data on the disposal of electronic gadgets.

Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP bloombergphotos:

Gadget Graveyard                                                                    
Discarded computer peripherals and electronics components are dismantled at a family compound of houses in Sangrampur village, West Bengal, India, on Sept. 9, 2014.
In 2012, 48.9 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, was generated worldwide, according to the Solving the e-Waste Problem (StEP) initiative, a United Nations program based in Germany.
Small-scale, household-style e-waste recycling of the sort practiced developing countries can involve hazardous, low-tech refining of metals from circuit boards and other difficult-to-recycle items.
The amount of e-waste generated worldwide — comprising everything from old black-and-white televisions to first-generation iPads — is set to grow 33 percent by 2017,  according to data culled from StEP’s press releases and its E-Waste World Map, an ongoing, online amalgamation of global data on the disposal of electronic gadgets.

Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP bloombergphotos:

Gadget Graveyard                                                                    
Discarded computer peripherals and electronics components are dismantled at a family compound of houses in Sangrampur village, West Bengal, India, on Sept. 9, 2014.
In 2012, 48.9 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, was generated worldwide, according to the Solving the e-Waste Problem (StEP) initiative, a United Nations program based in Germany.
Small-scale, household-style e-waste recycling of the sort practiced developing countries can involve hazardous, low-tech refining of metals from circuit boards and other difficult-to-recycle items.
The amount of e-waste generated worldwide — comprising everything from old black-and-white televisions to first-generation iPads — is set to grow 33 percent by 2017,  according to data culled from StEP’s press releases and its E-Waste World Map, an ongoing, online amalgamation of global data on the disposal of electronic gadgets.

Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg
© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP

bloombergphotos:

Gadget Graveyard                                                                    

Discarded computer peripherals and electronics components are dismantled at a family compound of houses in Sangrampur village, West Bengal, India, on Sept. 9, 2014.

In 2012, 48.9 million tons of electronic waste, or e-waste, was generated worldwide, according to the Solving the e-Waste Problem (StEP) initiative, a United Nations program based in Germany.

Small-scale, household-style e-waste recycling of the sort practiced developing countries can involve hazardous, low-tech refining of metals from circuit boards and other difficult-to-recycle items.

The amount of e-waste generated worldwide — comprising everything from old black-and-white televisions to first-generation iPads — is set to grow 33 percent by 2017,  according to data culled from StEP’s press releases and its E-Waste World Map, an ongoing, online amalgamation of global data on the disposal of electronic gadgets.

Photographer: Sanjit Das/Bloomberg

© 2014 Bloomberg Finance LP

theatlantic:

More Than Half of U.S. Public Schools Don’t Have Adequate Wireless Access

A crime is happening in our schools every day. And it’s not the type of crime that hall monitors or security cameras can solve. At issue: Only 39 percent of public schools have wireless network access for the whole school. But perhaps the greater offense—up to this point, at least—has been apathy.

At work and at home, most of us live our very wired, connected lives—moving between wi-fi zones as we give little thought to the millions of schoolchildren around the country who go to school every day without Internet or broadband connections, without access to 1:1 computing, and without the benefit of modern handheld learning devices.
 
Angry mobs of parents should be storming schools with pitchforks over this critical issue of broadband access, US Department of Education official Richard Culatta told this year’s SXSWedu festival. For their part, parents are not, but perhaps there is good reason to believe that the Storming of the Schoolhouse can be thwarted. For now.
 
President Barack Obama’s ConnectED initiative, announced this summer, aims within five years to connect 99 percent of America’s students through next-generation broadband (at speeds no less than 100 Mbps and with a target of 1 Gbps) and high-speed wireless networks in schools. Now we’re talking.
 
Read more. [Image: AP Photo]
“That raises the question of her own obituary. “Oh,” she replies gamely, “they’ll probably say I reflected life. That I spoke for women. That I was the first to come out in a man’s world and say, ‘Hey, we can say those things, too.’ I tell my husband Edgar Rosenberg , ‘You watch! It’ll all be there the day I die.’ ””